Configuring the $http request in angularjs – quick tip

angularjs‘ built-in $http service is good enough to serve most purposes. angularjs‘ built-in $http has the following methods:

  • $http.get(url, [config]): This is used to get data from the server where:
    • url: This is the absolute or relative URL path of destination request (required)
    • config: This is the configuration object (optional)
  • $http.head(url, [config]): This is used to get the full header information of the request where:
    • url: This is the absolute or relative URL path of destination request (required)
    • config: This is the configuration object (optional)
  • $http.post(url, data, [config]): This is used to post data to server where:
    • url: This is the absolute or relative URL path of destination request (required)
    • data: This is the data needed for post to the server (required)
    • config: This is the configuration object (optional)
  • $http.put(url, data, [config])
    • url: This is the absolute or relative URL path of destination request (required)
    • data: This is the data needs to post to the server (required)
    • config: This is the configuration object (optional)
  • $http.delete(url, [config]): This is used to delete data from the server where:
    • url: This is the absolute or relative URL path of destination request (required)
    • config: This is the configuration object (optional)
  • $http.jsonp(url, [config]): This is used to get JSON data from the server of a different domain where:
    • url: This is the absolute or relative URL path of destination request (required)
    • config: This is the configuration object (optional)
  • $http.patch(url, data, [config])
    • url: This is the absolute or relative URL path of destination request (required)
    • data: This is the data needs to post to the server (required)
    • config: This is the configuration object (optional)

    We can customize the default $http configuration, such as to set the customer header, transform the client request and server response, set timeout instead of default timeout, enable cache and/or set the response type, and so on.

About the author

Deven Rathore

I'm Deven Rathore, a multidisciplinary & self-taught designer with 3 years of experience. I'm passionate about technology, music, coffee, traveling and everything visually stimulating. Constantly learning and experiencing new things.

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by Deven Rathore
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